Some trompe l’oeil details at San Agustin




The trompe l’oeil paintings found inside of San Agustin is just impressive and awe inspiring. However because of the height of the ceiling and the often unlighted interior especially if there are no masses, some wonderful details can often be missed. Take for example at the crossing of the transept and nave where a faux dome is painted, two doves (left) can be seen between two pillars.






Three of San Agustin’s bells




The bell El D. Nombre de Jesus (The Most Sweet Name of Jesus – a reference to the Augustinian province) (left) inscribed with the words FECIT BENITVS REGIBVS, the latinized name of its caster, Benito de los Reyes, used to hang from the now demolished belfry. This bell is dated 1829 during the incumbency of the prior Fray Manuel Grijalbo. Three other names of Augustinian friars can be discerned but quite faintly.











San Agustin’s belfry




The belfry can be accessed through a narrow but short passageway at the antecoro, the room just before the choirloft. This passageway is a spiral staircase of adobe with a balustrade at the upperhalf made of hardwood. The first level leads to the rooftop while the bells can be found at the second level. Note that in 1854, it was agreed in a meeting that this second level be added for aesthetic reasons.











San Agustin’s mesirecordias at the choirloft




The choirstalls (left) at the choirloft is one of the intriguing works at San Agustin. The detailed woodwork calls to mind the intricacies of the pulpit and the motifs found makes it all the more valuable. Just imagine, strapwork done in the Renaissance style combined with Oriental emblems that attests to the uniqueness of religious art in this part of the world.