The interesting architecture of Hamtic’s cemetery chapel

Facade of Hamtic cemetery chapel

Facade of Hamtic cemetery chapel

Located less than a kilometer from the parish church and just a stone’s throw from the main highway, the dirt path leading to the entrance to the cemetery of Hamtic in Antique is wondrously lined with a species of tree that lends a forlorn feeling. Step inside the cemetery perimeter and you will be greeted with a beautifully constructed yet old chapel.

Two massive but squat pillars, with column designs at the front, guard the entrance to the cemetery and flanking both pillars are the old cemetery walls. I don’t really have information on when this cemetery, with its charming chapel was built and by whom but probably in the 19th century.

The chapel’s facade has three levels. The first with niches which goes around both sides of the nave and facade. The second level of the facade have bas reliefs in the form of columns while the second level of the nave has rectangular windows with three at each side.

It actually has an interesting design. Whereas most church architecture is clearly split into three or, rarely, four levels, this cemetery chapel’s center has a niche with a statue of the risen Christ between the second and third levels.

When you look at it from afar, it looks like two massive pillars at both sides that terminate with smaller belfries at the third level. Both are then connected with a ledge that forms the base of the niche with the Christ and a pediment that comes out diamond like in form.

The squatness and rigidity in form of the chapel is beautifully balanced with the vertical curves of the belfry. Traces of the original lime wash can still be seen at all sides of the chapel. The cemetery chapel of Hamtic is one of the beautiful ones that I have seen.

While doing a quick Google search, there were some links, one of which is this one claiming that this is the old parish church. I just think that this is quite erroneous and shows ignorance of the histories of catholic cemteries. First, it’s quite small for a parish church. Second, parish churches don’t have lots of niches for the dead. Third, a portion of the original perimeter wall of the present Hamtic parish church (a newer structure) can still be seen across the road.

Angled view of the cemetery chapel showing portion of its facade and nave

Angled view of the cemetery chapel showing portion of its facade and nave

Details of the facade

Details of the facade

Bas relief at the facade of the chapel

Bas relief at the facade of the chapel

Niches at the facade of the chapel

Niches at the facade of the chapel

Empty interior of chapel

Empty interior of chapel

Clockwise from top left: view of one of the entrance gate posts as seen from inside the cemetery; massive squat pillars that form the cemetery entrance; section of the cemetery front wall and pillar; view of nave window

Clockwise from top left: view of one of the entrance gate posts as seen from inside the cemetery; massive squat pillars that form the cemetery entrance; section of the cemetery front wall and pillar; view of nave window

Top, view of the back of the pediment and 'belfry;' lower right, nave near facade; lower left, nave, near back

Top, view of the back of the pediment and ‘belfry;’ lower right, nave near facade; lower left, nave, near back

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2 Comments

  1. What time of the day did you shoot the façade? I noticed the sun is shining on the back of the church already….

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