Interior of Pavia’s romanesque church

View of the interior from the back

View of the interior from the back

Space beside the main entrance

Space beside the main entrance

Pavia Church in Iloilo City is one of the province’s beautiful churches. While much of the exterior is intact, although there have been newer bricks at some sections, the interior has been altered so much. Finished in the last decade of the 19th century, the structure was burned, like many other churches in Iloilo, by revolutionaries during the revolution against Spain.

READ MORE: Exterior of Pavia’s romanesque church in Iloilo

In an archival image from the Filipinas Heritage Library, circa 1971, the cement columns were starting to replace the timber posts. The clerestory windows, although not too clear, seems rectangular as compared to today which is made of cement and resembled more of a port hole. I am not sure what the original clerestory section was made of. Was it made of wood? Or even tabique pampango?

Today, the church is more of its original shell with new additions. Cement arched columns have been put in place of the timber posts. If one will take a peek at the spaces flanking the main entrance, there are now cement columns that provide support to the upper part of the facade and the roof is modern with iron trusses.

View as seen from the altar

View as seen from the altar

Another view of the room beside the presbytery

Another view of the room beside the presbytery

Altar of Pavia Church

Altar of Pavia Church

The beautiful ceiling above altar

The beautiful ceiling above altar

Another view of the nave

Another view of the nave

The room beside the presbytery

The room beside the presbytery

View of the nave

View of the nave

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